Tag Archives: weaving

Two Rag Rugs in Rosepath

The two rag rugs I completed this week were closer to the kind of result I have been aiming for but had not quite achieved. The rugs used a double thickness of weft, made up of old business shirts and old sheets cut into 1 inch (2.5  cm strips) sewn together. The two weft strips were of different fabrics in the yellow toned rug and I am very pleased with the variation in tone that this achieved.

I chose to make folded hems as it’s likely they’ll end up as bath mats and experience has taught me that a fringed finish is like a magnet for fluff. Also I expect a folded hem to wear very well.

The new pro-tip from this project was serging (overlocking) the ends of the rug when they came off the loom. This gave me a tidy finish and secure ends.

Sett was 10 dpi in a 10 dent reed, threading was rosepath over 8. Warp 8/4 cotton in blue.

 

 

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Transparent Weave Summer School Class

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Transparent, indeed

This year I joined the Handweavers and Spinners Guild of Victoria summer school workshop impressively titled Sheer Delight- Transparent Weave Inlay Techniques.

We warped our looms with a fine linen and learned how to use inlays in different colours and textures to make pictures or room dividers.

I’m generally more of a weaver of household items and I enjoyed being taken to a new place with my weaving. It’s probably not a technique I’ll use again soon but I’m happy to have a new technique in my repertoire.

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Completed Hand Towels

I have now completed the six hand towels and while they aren’t without their treadling faults, I’m pretty happy.

hand towels

They were dented at 2-2 in a 10 dpi reed and the sett was 20 epi. The 6/2 cotton was sourced from Lunatic Fringe Yarns. Now they’ve been washed and pressed, the slightly funny selvages have come good and I’m happy that I made what I planned to and that my calculations were all OK. I was able to play with a number of twill patterns and that was great fun, as well as being part of the original project plan.

I did try a different, thicker weft yarn in plain weave with the small amount of warp left over on my Dorset loom after I completed the towels. I sampled using a pale yellow cotton weft yarn that’s a little thicker than 8/4 cotton. I can’t say too much more about that yarn as it was part of a yarn de-stash I purchased from a former loom owner who had a clean up over the holidays.

After washing the plain weave sample it’s looking like a winning combination for some future tea towels (dish towels) as the cloth is very stable, looks attractive and will have good absorbency.

True to form, I have the next project in mind already but putting that warp on the loom will have to wait until after Weaving Summer School at the Guild.

 

Hand Towels in Twill

This twill exploration project is for hand towels that measure 10 1/2 inches wide in the reed. I am using 6/2 cotton and a sett of 20dpi.

The plan is to make a set of six towels and use different treadlings and combinations of the two colours.

I had a few warp tension issues and made a very serious threading error. The books tell you how to fix one wrong warp thread. They’re not so helpful when you have a block of 12 threads that are all wrong. My solution (as I had already started weaving) was to chop the whole lot off, fix the error and then tie the warp on again.

The first towel was 2/2 twill. The next will be broken twill. At the moment I don’t quite have an even weave so once again I find myself praying that the miracle of wet finishing will once again be transformative. This weaving business is hard.

And fun.

Hanten Jacket 

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Do your projects sometimes take on a life of their own? This one did for me. It was intended to be a prototype but ended up as a project. Here’s the story:

I wanted to be true to the origins of the hanten jacket, a padded garment traditionally worn by workers.

Being true meant adding batting, which added complexity and a need for quilting.

Adding batting meant adding a lining, which for me was unbleached calico from my stash.

Following tradition meant having a contrasting neck band, which I read about online.

Being thrifty meant finding a wooden barrel button at the ops shop (charity shop.)

Using a button closure meant braiding a round kumihimo eight strand braid for the button loop and button band.

Using a round kumihimo eight strand braid closure meant learning how to transition that round braid to an eight strand flat braid so I could comfortably fit it under the sewing machine presser foot to attach it to the front band.

And dos it goes….

Pattern Source: Clothing from the Hands that Weave by Anita Luvera Mayer from Kay Faulkners extensive library.

In progress. I later swapped the fabric hanging loop for a braided one. Prototype closure elements.

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Quilting template and kumihimo disk. 3/2 cotton for the braids.

A Rag Rug of Firsts

This rag rag was always intended to be a test. It was the first time I used warp from my big cone of 8/4 cotton rug warp, a first time using a temple (stretcher), a first time finishing a rug with a turned edge and a first time weaving with a rose path threading.

Rag rug made with old sheets and shirts for weft

The hemmed ends are a first


 
Lessons learned:

  1. Don’t keep threading after you start feeling tired. You will regret it when you find yourself rethreading the following day.
  2. Measure twice, cut once. I was two warp threads short. The problem was easily solved with a new length of warp and some washers for weights, but I had to think about how to solve it.
  3. Using a temple is well worthwhile. No draw in visible this time.
  4. It’s worth the time sewing strips together for the weft but this only worked well for me with the main pattern 1 1/2 inch strips.  The sewn joins on the narrower 1cm strips that I used for the hemmed edges pulled apart under tension.
  5. Worn out sheets make excellent weft strips. This rug has a combination of worn fabrics (old sheets and shirts) and new fabrics (the dark blue is a remnant and the brown is a never used bed skirt from the op shop.) The worn fabrics packed in better and were less rigid in the finished mat.
  6. Don’t be frightened to make up your own design. Magazines and books are great but so are your pencil, your calculator and your mind. One of the reasons I bought the huge mill end spool of cotton rug warp was so I could experiment freely without worrying about wasting expensive rug warp.

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The rose path threading yielded sections with patterns that remind me of the beach. It’s a lot less formal a look than I had in mind but I like the unstructured look. Having said that, the rose path border patterns I tried to achieve were a total bust. I don’t know what went wrong and I’m keen to try again.

I plan to have a crack at dying the warp next. I like the yellow, but I also like variety.

Summer and Winter at Rug Weaving Summer School

Once again, Summer School  at the Handweavers and Spinners Guild of Victoria was a great learning experience and a highlight of my summer.

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Don’t you love the colours? Yarn from Velieris

This year’s theme was Summer and Winter. I  got going early with dressing my loom, using a supplied warp that had three (?) crosses in it. The early start was a good thing as I found that (more) rust had developed on the metal bars that hold the heddles. I’m sure those bars have a name. Don’t know what the name is, though. If you do, leave a comment.

The rust looked unattractive and stopped me moving the heddles easily. Tinkerer gave some furniture wax to treat the bars with and that helped. Now all I need is some way to clean up the reed, which is also a bit rusty.

The rug yarn was a beautiful colour and quality, tightly plied and perfect for the task. It came to me via a beautiful act,  a random act of kindness from my fellow blogger over at Reduce reuse recycle who was given the rug yarn samples by Velieris. She didn’t have a use for rug yarn and offered it to me, even bringing it around to my home on a hot day when there were crazy roadworks in my area. Thank you cheliamoose.

Before class I wove a heading and had a play with a pattern. It wasn’t looking right and it took me embarrassingly long to work out I should be weaving with two shuttles. This picture from Nutfield Weaver helped.

I’ll post pictures of my class samples when I’ve cut them off the loom. I might also show you my loom transport solution and the fold up loom table that Tinkerer made for me.